PIA20717: California Drought Effects on Sierra Trees Mapped by NASA
 Target Name:  Earth
 Is a satellite of:  Sol (our sun)
 Mission:  Earth Observing System (EOS)
 Spacecraft:  ER-2
 Instrument:  AVIRIS
 Product Size:  1019 x 1278 pixels (w x h)
 Produced By:  JPL
 Full-Res TIFF:  PIA20717.tif (635.6 kB)
 Full-Res JPEG:  PIA20717.jpg (227.2 kB)

Click on the image above to download a moderately sized image in JPEG format (possibly reduced in size from original)

Original Caption Released with Image:

A new map created with measurements from an airborne instrument developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, reveals the devastating effect of California's ongoing drought on Sierra Nevada conifer forests.

The map will be used to help the U.S. Forest Service assess and respond to the impacts of increased tree mortality caused by the drought, particularly where wildlands meet urban areas within the Sierra National Forest.

After several years of extreme drought, the highly stressed conifers (trees or bushes that produce cones and are usually green year-round) of the Sierra Nevada are now more susceptible to bark beetles (Dendroctonus spp.). While bark beetles killing trees in the Sierra Nevada is a natural phenomenon, the scale of mortality in the last couple of years is far greater than previously observed. The U.S. Forest Service is using recent airborne spectroscopic measurements from NASA's Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument aboard NASA's ER-2 aircraft, together with new advanced algorithms, to quantify this impact over this large region of rugged terrain. The high-altitude ER-2 aircraft is based at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, California.

The image was created by scientists at the USFS's Pacific Southwest Region Remote Sensing Lab, McClellan, California, by performing a time series analysis of AVIRIS images. Scientists evaluated baseline tree mortality on public lands in the summer of 2015 using a machine learning algorithm called "random forest." This algorithm classifies the AVIRIS measurements as dominated by either shrubs, healthy trees or newly dead conifer trees.

To quantify how much the amount of dead vegetation increased during the fall of 2015, the Forest Service scientists conducted an advanced spectral mixture analysis. This analysis evaluates each spectrum to determine the fraction of green vegetation, dead vegetation and soil. The full spectral range of AVIRIS is important to separate the signatures of soil and dead vegetation. To produce this comprehensive Sierra National Forest tree mortality map, the result from the summer of 2015 was evaluated to look for increases of more than 10 percent in dead vegetation during the fall of 2015.

AVIRIS measures spectra of the Earth system to conduct advanced science research. These western U.S. AVIRIS measurements were acquired as part of NASA's Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) preparatory airborne campaign. HyspIRI was one of the space missions suggested to NASA by the National Academy of Sciences in its 2007 decadal survey for Earth Science. In the future, HyspIRI could provide spectral and thermal measurements of this type globally for ecosystem research and additional science objectives.

AVIRIS data are available for download and are being used for a range of additional science investigations. For more on AVIRIS, visit http://airbornescience.jpl.nasa.gov/campaign/aviris. For more on NASA's Airborne Science Program, visit http://airbornescience.nasa.gov/. For more on HyspIRI, visit http://hyspiri.jpl.nasa.gov/.

NASA collects data from space, air, land and sea to increase our understanding of our home planet, improve lives and safeguard our future. NASA develops new ways to observe and study Earth's interconnected natural systems with long-term data records. The agency freely shares this unique knowledge and works with institutions around the world to gain new insights into how our planet is changing.

For more information about NASA's Earth science activities, visit http://www.nasa.gov/earth.

Image Credit:
NASA-JPL/Caltech/GSFC

Image Addition Date:
2016-06-27